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View Full Version : Don't Blame Goodell or Harrison



StillinBaltimore
12-14-2011, 11:09 AM
Harrison's suspension is not Roger Goodell's fault. It's not even James Harrison's fault.

IT'S OUR FAULT!

Yup... every time you wait in line for 15 years for PSLs, every time you buy the NFL package for your TV, every time you pay for a seat at Hines or travel to another stadium, every time you buy an Officially licensed $250 James Harrison jersey you are giving Goodell and his money-grubbing cocksucking cronnies more reason to issue fines and now suspensions.

No, you say?

They have you by the balls and you don't even know it.

THEY ARE TAKING HARD HITS OUT OF THE LEAGUE TO PUT TOGETHER SAFETY (INSURANCE) NUMBERS THAT WILL JUSTIFY ADDING 2 REGULAR SEASON GAMES IN ORDER TO CASH IN ON THEIR PRODUCT THAT HAS FORGED THE LARGEST FOLLOWING IN THE RICHEST COUNTRY IN THE WORLD. PERIOD.

Why, you ask? Because they can!

They are cashing in on a game that was forged on hard-hitting, gut-wrenching play that we LOVE. And now that you would NEVER consider missing a game at the stadium or at your house or one your smart phone or while on vacation in Somolia, they are changing the game to fit their profit projections for the next 10 years. Which are projected to double... btw.

How can you blame closed-fisted Roger Goodell and the league for fining and suspending players for playing the game the way its been played for 80 years!? They are just cashing in on and looking out for their league, that WE dedicate so much money and personal attention to.

If you want to keep them from changing the game, then just STOP GIVING THEM YOUR MONEY. Take the game out of your life and stop supporting a product that is diluted and trumped up with higher scoring and ridiculous passing numbers and that does not want WARRIORS like James Harrison around anymore.

Unfortunately, I will be watching the game on Monday night.

BTW... everyone wear your Harrison jersey, I'll have mine on!!!!!!!

steelersbabex25
12-14-2011, 11:21 AM
Watch me.

LatrobePA
12-14-2011, 11:26 AM
I blame Tim Tebow!

CowherPower
12-14-2011, 11:30 AM
The NFL absolutely has the fans by the throat and if they don't see it they are blind. Your merchandise money, ticket money, everything you spend on that has anything to do with the Steelers or the NFL in some part goes right into the NFL's piggy bank.

They know the fans will not stop watching the game, they know jersey's will still be purchased, and in the end no matter what they do people will not change their Sunday afternoon routine. In fact the only thing stopping people these days from spending more is just the economy in general. It's hard for the average joe fan to take his family to a game because it costs you $500.00 for tickets, parking, gas, food, hotel, etc. If anything they should doing all they can to make games more accessible to average families struggling to survive. Yet they continue to allow teams to raise ticket prices, parking prices, merchandise prizes, and what have you.

In the end there's nothing we as fans can do to change the NFL and the path it's going on. If anything you can hold the Rooney's partly responsible for this because they campaigned hard for Roger Goodell to get this position after Tagliabue stepped down.

The league doesn't care what the fans think, how much we complain, or threaten to boycott games because they know in the end they can do what they want, when they want and the people will still keep coming back.

StillinBaltimore
12-14-2011, 11:37 AM
The NFL absolutely has the fans by the throat and if they don't see it they are blind. Your merchandise money, ticket money, everything you spend on that has anything to do with the Steelers or the NFL in some part goes right into the NFL's piggy bank.

They know the fans will not stop watching the game, they know jersey's will still be purchased, and in the end no matter what they do people will not change their Sunday afternoon routine. In fact the only thing stopping people these days from spending more is just the economy in general. It's hard for the average joe fan to take his family to a game because it costs you $500.00 for tickets, parking, gas, food, hotel, etc. If anything they should doing all they can to make games more accessible to average families struggling to survive. Yet they continue to allow teams to raise ticket prices, parking prices, merchandise prizes, and what have you.

In the end there's nothing we as fans can do to change the NFL and the path it's going on. If anything you can hold the Rooney's partly responsible for this because they campaigned hard for Roger Goodell to get this position after Tagliabue stepped down.

The league doesn't care what the fans think, how much we complain, or threaten to boycott games because they know in the end they can do what they want, when they want and the people will still keep coming back.



I know this is kinda corny but I started an FB group a while ago with the intention of spreading ideas to try and hit the NFL in the purse. Like "Game-pooling" (having multiple people at one house for each game) and only watching our game each week. If you want, check it out. I know it is futile but what the hell.

http://www.facebook.com/groups/301579199870493/

RIVERS OF STEEL
12-14-2011, 11:46 AM
I'm guessing by the TV ratings even if fans didn't show up at the stadiums (read Cincy PBS home games) it wouldn't matter to the commie (read comish) one bit. The money is there from other sources. Just like NASCAR (stopped watchin that sorry excuse for a racing series long ago. A cheap product for a higher price. What a deal. But, what other alternative is there for you or I personally except to dial out. Not yet but, maybe close.Thanks you rich overpaid hoes.
There is still NHL and motorcicle racing left for the manly man and womam womam.

JensK
12-14-2011, 02:06 PM
I blame Tim Tebow!

**** YES! I concur

Speeed
12-14-2011, 02:19 PM
And these rules are killing the fans too. Hits that had fans hi-fiving each other a few years ago are now a basis for finger pointing, I told you so's, and stupid arguments. The tone on boards is different these days. Especially on rival boards. It is dividing the fans, gone are the days good sportsmanship among fans.

This place is pretty tame, a few remarks here and there. I frequent a Ravens board and that place is nasty. The game is no longer important, it is fines, suspensions, etc. It is embarrassing.

I feel really bad for Harrison no matter what the legality of that hit.


The NFL absolutely has the fans by the throat ...

TampaSteelGirl
12-14-2011, 02:59 PM
I blame Tim Tebow!

ME TOO!!! :greengrin:

steelersbabex25
12-14-2011, 03:18 PM
But God loves Tim Tebow..

SteelCurtain1974
12-14-2011, 03:39 PM
I must agree with the majority here.

LatrobePA
12-14-2011, 03:40 PM
But God loves Tim Tebow..

WRONG! Tebow is GOD! No lie he really is!

--- Added 12/14/2011 at 01:40 PM ---


I must agree with the majority here.

Tebow?

LarryNJ
12-14-2011, 04:54 PM
I agree it's not the commissioners or JH fault, although I don't think it's the fans fault either.

It's attorneys and ex players trying to make millions even billions with lawsuit after lawsuit. Here's another one :


No Pain, No Gain? Not So Fast
By NATE JACKSON

Ex-Players Suing N.F.L Over Use of Painkiller (December 6, 2011)

THE former professional football player is confused. It is difficult for him to pinpoint, after the pads have come off for good, the precise cause of his aching body and his aching soul. He knows that the game did it. But what part of the game? Was it the physical violence? The psychological warfare? The realization that his life peaked in his 20s? The drugs he took to stay on the field? Whatever the cause, there is always the pain. The pain is constant in football and as a result it is constantly being manipulated.

Last week a group of 12 former National Football League players filed a class-action lawsuit against the league, claiming that the N.F.L. and its teams failed to warn players of the side effects of the drug Toradol, widely administered to players before games to numb pain. The lawsuit contends that the use of the drug masked injuries like concussions and thus further endangered the athletes.

When I played for the Denver Broncos, from 2003 to 2008, Toradol was a popular pregame injection. The night before we took the field, 10 to 20 of us would go into a designated room and stand in line to receive our shots. I don’t remember what, if any, specific injury I was nursing on any particular occasion. I do remember that my body was perpetually feeling bad, as were those of my teammates. Our training staff knew this and would encourage us to get a shot. We were told it would make us feel better. So we lined up for the needle.

When I got to the front of the line, I was told that the shot was known to cause internal bleeding in a very small percentage of patients but otherwise was safe. This disclaimer was given with needle in hand and a line of men waiting behind me. There was no hesitation, no trepidation, no point at which I felt that taking Toradol was a risk. I trusted our team doctors. They wouldn’t suggest a drug if it was dangerous.

The big risk, in my mind, was not being at my best the next day. The big risk was not taking the shot, playing poorly and being viewed by the staff as unwilling to do what it took to help the team win. The big risk was losing my job.

The N.F.L. is a machine. The operators of the machine pull its levers more frantically every season, pushing it past its breaking point. So the league has stockpiled interchangeable spare parts. The broken ones are seamlessly replaced and the machine keeps rolling. The old pieces are discarded and left to rust in a scrap heap.

This harsh reality is softened by human relationships. Football players spend every day with the members of their team’s medical staff. They learn to trust them. The athletic trainers nurse the players back to health when they are injured. The team doctors perform their operations. Friendships are formed and bonds are created. But underneath it all hums the machine.

Athletic trainers are paid to keep the machine humming. The long-term health of the individual player is not their first concern; the health of the team is. The faster a trainer gets his players back on the field, the more likely he’ll be to keep his job. Trainers are under pressure to do this by masking a player’s pain with drugs and designing a hasty rehabilitation schedule, even if it inevitably trades one injury for the next.

The player rarely if ever has a say in the treatment process. When he is injured, the athletic trainers and team doctors take the necessary X-rays and M.R.I.’s and decide on the course of action among themselves. Only afterward do they tell the player what injury they have found and how they will treat it. If the player seeks a second opinion, which he is technically allowed to do, it is taken as an affront to the medical staff, and he will be treated in the training room like a turncoat. The medical staff issues its reports to the head coach, and is often beholden to him, which is another reason that players don’t challenge their diagnoses or treatments.

The player is not told how to access his medical records or whether he even has a right to them. The folder of my medical records was as thick as a dictionary and I never had access to it. Even after I filed a workers’ compensation lawsuit against the Broncos a year ago that later included a request for that folder, I still don’t have it. The team hasn’t released it to me.

If the N.F.L. is serious about protecting its players, it should appoint a league-wide medical body, unaffiliated with any specific team, to oversee players’ health. Such an institution would be able to provide care to the athlete without the interests of his team distorting treatment.

Until then, teams will continue to convince players that their bodies and brains are ready for professional football, even when they are not. The injured body needs coaxing. It needs to be stroked, rubbed, heated, stretched and lied to. There are coaches, owners, trainers, fans and a host of media people counting on the players, after all, ready to question their manhood if they decide that the pain is too much to bear.

But the next game, the game that right now feels so important, will pass. In a couple of weeks, few will ever speak of it again. And then it’s on to the next one. And the machine will keep humming.

Nate Jackson is working on a book about life in the N.F.L.

http://www.nytimes.com/2011/12/14/opinion/painkillers-for-nfl-players-not-so-fast.html?_r=1

I don't blame the owners at all for trying to protect their money.

StillersSound
12-14-2011, 07:20 PM
If you want to keep them from changing the game, then just STOP GIVING THEM YOUR MONEY. Take the game out of your life and stop supporting a product that is diluted and trumped up with higher scoring and ridiculous passing numbers and that does not want WARRIORS like James Harrison around anymore.

I'm with you I'm mad too BUT we can't stop supporting our team after all these years. It would take more then just Steelers fans, it would take NFL fans and you really think other fans are going to rally behind us. Teams around the league are probably happy our players cant lay the wood on them anymore. Also, if a large number of fans stop giving money to the Steelers then the product on the field would eventually suffer and give other teams a window to succeed and you think teams that haven't won in years are going to go you know what I can't support this team because a stupid rule hurt the Steelers and this isn't fair. We would eventually be Browns fans :(

Basically it's a stupid rule. A rule in place because of our team. Only thing we can do is support our players and let them know we support them. I don't know if James gets money from a jersey being sold but get something going where Steelers fans buy his jersey to help pay for the fines/support or put up a banner at the next home game, Harrison Country. They would never allow it but we have to do something. This is getting ridiculous.

CowherPower
12-15-2011, 05:34 PM
The NFL fans across the globe would never be able to pull off any type of coupe against the league and actually stop supporting them for a period of time. There's too many people that just want to go to a game with their family, or too many hard core fans that have been to every game since the dawn of time. The league will continue to do what it wants and we as fans will continue to feed the machine.

LevonKirkland99
12-15-2011, 11:04 PM
Why Tebow? Poor guy, all he did was try to win and people think he should stop praying to God :) Some people pray to God and other bitch and curse but hey that's life I guess!

Harrison will be fine and who knows maybe his back needs a rest anyway!